Networking for career success

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YSPN Brisbane’s carefully planned events continue to attract the youth

Finally, here’s an organisation dedicated to Indian origin youth in Australia.

But hang on, this is one with a twist.

The Young Sikh Professionals Network (YSPN) is a platform for individuals to come together to network, mentor and socialise amongst peers and learn ways to facilitate their own career success. It has chapters in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Perth.

YSPN Brisbane.Indian Link

“YSPN is all about networking,” Simran Kaur of YSPN Brisbane’s marketing team, told Indian Link. “You inspire and motivate along the way. It is open to people from the age group of 20-40, working together to achieve and accelerate professional and personal growth.”

Members claim they enjoy YSPN’s networking events that are planned with much thought, attending to derive inspiration and connect with like-minded people.

At a recent event, YSPN Brisbane organised in April at the Australian Institute of Management, Curtis Pitt, Treasurer of Queensland, and the Minister for Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Partnerships and Sport, was invited to speak to the young professionals.

Simran observed that Mr Pitt was the ideal person for this marquee event, as he shares a close relationship with the Sikh community in his town of Gordonvale, North Queensland. Gordonvale was the first settlement of Sikhs when they migrated to Australia 120 years ago.

Mr Pitt was also one of the first politicians to come forward and support Sikhs to be excused from wearing helmets when riding bicycles, as he understood the value and importance of turbans in the Sikh community.

Brisbane International Student Ambassadors.Indian Link

Addressing the audience, Mr Pitt shed light on his foray into politics, terming himself an “accidental politician”.

“I try to forget the hours I do each week, shuttling between Brisbane and visiting family in Gordonvale.”

Commenting on his nature of work during a Q&A session post his address, he said that working in parliament is like working in retail.

“Every day is different. You have to like people, be customer-focussed and outcome-focussed.”

Being customer-focussed in his job also includes being sensitive to multiculturalism. Mr Pitt claims he understands and respects people and culture. “We have a unique pot of melting cultures, and mutual respect is earned amongst people.”

The recent Gordonvale domestic violence incident, where two women of the Sikh community were stabbed to death, was an issue close to home for Mr Pitt. He said that this local tragedy had shaken not only the Gordonvale community but also him at a personal level. He knew the deceased well, and this incident brought the wider community together.

Advising the gathering about reaching their goals, Mr Pitt said, “You need to have optimism, and a thirst for knowledge and advancement.”

Finishing the session, when asked for his top money tip, he chuckled, “Bet on the Melbourne Cup!”

He then added, “Nah, you need to be prudent, and never lose sight of your original investment. Nothing beats hard work and consistency.”

Karan Anand, Chair of YSPN, spoke for all his peers when he said he found the session inspiring. “As a unique one off organisation of first generation professionals in Australia, we want to engage Sikhs and other professionals from the wider Indian community through more such events in the future.”

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