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Canberra Uni and Cricket ACT partner to boost cricket studies in India

The collaboration aims to level the playing field, especially for girls and women in cricket, while creating opportunities for cultural exchange between the two nations.

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In a stride towards fostering cricket education and cultural exchange between India and Australia, the University of Canberra (UC) and Cricket ACT have collaborated to provide tailored in-school programs aimed at enhancing the skills of aspiring young cricket players across India.

The partnership, sealed with an agreement signed by University of Canberra Interim Vice-Chancellor Professor Lucy Johnston and Cricket ACT CEO Olivia Thornton at the Jamia Millia Islamia University Ground in New Delhi last month, aims to bring an international perspective to cricket education in India.

Professor Lucy Johnston told Indian Link, “In India, the partnership will open UC staff, elite athletes, and Cricket ACT’s players and coaches to coach and work with Indian students and coaches to build knowledge and exchange experiences.”

Elaborating on the partnership’s initiatives, Johnston also spoke of the establishment of the annual flagship UC India Cricket Cup, a seven-day cricket carnival inviting the best talents from partner schools in India to compete. This initiative – the Australian cricket studies in India –also provides an opportunity for select students to visit Canberra and immerse themselves in the local sporting culture.

The collaboration aims to level the playing field, especially for girls and women in cricket, while creating opportunities for cultural exchange between the two nations.

“Sport is an integral part of UC’s vision to be one of Australia’s leading universities for Sport – harnessing the power of Sport for social justice, equality, inclusion, integrity and wellbeing; focusing our efforts on women in Sport; and translating our knowledge of elite athlete performance to foster community sport participation,” Johnston noted.

The partnership entails various arrangements, including sponsorships, work-integrated learning opportunities providing practical industry experience for students, opportunities for collaborative research with industry partners, and ‘study and play’ pathways for Indian students in Canberra.

“With cricket deeply entrenched in the sporting scenes of both India and Australia, this was a great opportunity to engage in this shared passion,” Johnston said. “We hope this Australian cricket studies in India will help to empower young cricketers in India with the aptitude needed to excel both on and off the field, ultimately contributing to India’s amazing cricketing legacy on the global stage.”

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