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Country Of Origin Labelling Campaign Commences

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Australia’s new country of origin labelling reforms are designed to show consumers at a glance where a food product was grown, produced, made or packed

The next phase of the Turnbull Government’s campaign to help consumers understand new country of origin labels on food products will commence from 10 May.
The Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science Arthur Sinodinos said the campaign was designed to make people aware of the new labelling laws and how they are being used on food products.
country of origin labelling.Indian Link
‘Many people will have already noticed the new labels starting to appear on products in stores. Now is a perfect time to let people know what they’re all about,” Senator Sinodinos said.
“Over the next five weeks, advertising showing what the new labels mean and where people can find more information will run on television and radio, in newspapers, online and in shopping centres.”
Complementing the advertising campaign, demonstrations will be held throughout May in selected supermarkets around the country. Shoppers will be able to take home information explaining the new labels.
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources Barnaby Joyce said the new labels were appearing on food products in Australia as a result of regulatory reforms around country of origin labelling.
“Until now, country of origin labelling information for food has been inconsistent and confusing. These reforms change that, and the Australian public will now be able to see how much of a product comes from Australia,” Minister Joyce said.
“We’re continuing to work with food producers, growers and manufacturers to ensure they understand the new labelling requirements and how to apply them to their products.
“It’s great to see these labels appearing on shelves already, giving shoppers clear and meaningful information about where their food comes from.”
The new country of origin labelling reforms are designed to show consumers at a glance where a food product was grown, produced, made or packed. The labels will also indicate the percentage of ingredients from Australia.
Most food produced, grown or made in Australia will have the kangaroo logo. The percentage of Australian ingredients is indicated through text and a bar chart.
For imported foods, the label will clearly show the country of origin.
Food that was packed in Australia will only feature a bar chart that indicates the percentage of Australian ingredients.
The reforms commenced on 1 July 2016. There is a two-year transition period before the new rules become mandatory on 1 July 2018.
Further information for consumers is available at foodlabels.industry.gov.au.
Businesses needing assistance with labelling can visit business.gov.au/foodlabels

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