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Sunday, April 11, 2021

Indian app to support farmers wins 2020 ‘Call for Code’ challenge

Their winning solution evaluates climate and soil conditions to help farmers.

Reading Time: 2 minutes 

India-based agri-tech startup AI Farm has been chosen as the Asia Pacific Regional Winner of Call for Code, a competition asked developers to create solutions to help communities fight back against climate change and Covid-19.

AI Farm won for developing an intelligent system that evaluates climate and soil conditions to provide farmers with information to adapt their crop strategies.

They will receive $5,000 (about 3.7 lakh) as the regional winners of the ‘2020 Call for Code Global Challenge’.

Call for Code was launched in 2018 alongside founding Partner IBM and UN Human Rights.

The application by AI Farm is an intelligent system that aims to provide farmers with the information they need to adapt their crop strategies to optimise water usage and control disease.

READ MORE: 2 Indian startups selected for Accenture mentorship programme

agritech ai farm
Source: IANS

The solution is a low-cost system that uses sensors to monitor groundwater levels, temperature, and humidity.

Another agri-tech startup Agrolly won the global prize for innovative solution to help small farmers as they struggle with effects of climate change.

“Agrolly and AI Farm were both named top solutions this year, highlighting the importance of agriculture. Technology can help farmers combat growing challenges from climate change through the application of emerging technologies like cloud, AI and IoT,” said Priya Mallya, Country Leader, Developer Ecosystems, IBM ISA.

Call for Code has also introduced a new initiative – Call for Code for Racial Justice – inviting developers to apply their skills and ingenuity to combat systemic racism.

IANS

READ MORE: A first: hing cultivation in Himachal valley

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