fbpx

Indian medics condemn move allowing Ayurveda docs to perform surgery

The move would allow them to perform procedures like skin grafting and cataract surgery.

Reading Time: 3 minutes

 

The Indian Medical Association (IMA) has strongly condemned the recent move by the Central government which will allow post-graduate scholars of Ayurveda to formally practice general surgery, including ortho and dentistry.

The IMA stated that it saw this move as a retrograde step of mixing the systems which, it said, will be resisted at all costs.

“All over India, students and practitioners of modern medicine are agitated over this violation of mutual identity and respect,” the IMA said.

It also urged the Central Council of Indian Medicine (CCIM), which regulates the medical study and practice of Ayurveda in the country, to develop its own surgical disciplines from its own ancient texts and not claim the surgical disciplines of modern medicine as its own.

“We unequivocally condemn the uncivil ways of the Central Council of Indian Medicine to arrogate itself to vivisect modern medicine and empower its practitioners with undeserving areas of practice. The said council has come out with a gazette notification of a list of surgical procedures which can be performed by its practitioners. They have no right to the technical terms, techniques and procedures of modern medicine. IMA draws the ‘Lakshman Rekha’ which they can cross at their peril,” the IMA said.

In a gazette notification dated 20 November, the CCIM amended the Indian Medicine Central Council Regulations, 2016 to introduce formal training and practice of surgeries to the PG students of Ayurveda.

The students would receive training in ‘shalya’ (general surgery) and ‘shalakya’ (diseases of ear, nose, throat, eye, head, oro-dentistry) specialisations. It will make them legally valid to perform procedures such as skin grafting, cataract surgery and root canal treatment.

READ MORE: India’s first precision stenting procedure saves woman’s life

surgery-in-hospital-clinic-and-doctors-206-minimum
Source: Fshoq

“What is the sanctity of the NEET if such lateral shortcuts are devised? IMA demands to withdraw the order and first delineate the Indian Medicine disciplines based on original Indian Medicine texts. The CCIM has the dubious reputation of prescribing modern medicine text books to its students. IMA exhorts the CCIM to develop its own surgical disciplines from its own ancient texts and not claim the surgical disciplines of modern medicine as its own. Such a deviant practice is unbecoming of a statutory body,” the IMA added.

The IMA also has asked its members and the medical fraternity not to teach disciplines of modern medicine to the students of other systems.

The latest move by the Centre is an addition to the host of decisions taken amid the Covid-19 pandemic, which shows an impending paradigm shift in healthcare from modern medicine to the traditional form.

Annulling the Medical Council of India to form National Medical Commission and introducing Commission for Allied and Healthcare Professions Bill, 2020, which allows assorted paramedics to practice medicine independently, are a few of the decisions which have put the modern medicine practitioners in deep concern regarding the future of healthcare.

The IMA has been openly opposing such policy moves by the Centre, especially the plan to mix modern medicine with the traditional systems of Ayurveda, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha, and Homoeopathy (AYUSH), in coming years, as envisaged by the Centre.

Rajan Sharma, President, IMA, had earlier stated that an integrative system of medicine would create a “khichdi medical system” and would produce hybrid doctors.

IANS

READ MORE: Almost 200 doctors have succumbed to COVID-19 in India

- Advertisement -

Related Articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

Podcasts

Listen to Indian Link’s NEW Travel Podcast

0
  Indian Link's NEW travel podcast- Feel New In NSW is all about travel and especially made for people who love to explore places in...

It’s National Blood Donor Week

0
  It’s National Blood Donor Week. In our new podcast host Ekta Sharma speaks to Canberra‘s Nidhi Kaushik who runs an amazing donation campaign every year....

Let’s Talk Boosters: Indian Link podcast

0
  In LET'S TALK BOOSTERS, a new podcast series by Indian Link, host Ekta Sharma quizzes Dr Kritman Dhamoon of Blacktown Hospital Sydney about booster...
- Advertisement -

Latest News

neil chandran fraud

Indian-origin entrepreneur charged for $45mn investment fraud

0
  An Indian-origin entrepreneur with ambitious goals of developing virtual-world technologies has been arrested and charged by federal prosecutors in an alleged $45 million investment...
Rajyasree Sen

The Sweet Kitchen: a guide to Indian desserts through the centuries

0
  A food columnist for years at Wall Street Journal India, Rajyasree Sen has written columns on food for a variety of publications and also...
kids in kitchen

4 reasons to bring children into the kitchen

0
  The kitchen is a simple and casual place, but it can also be a hub for developing and enhancing your kid's skills, be it...
whalers way birds

Saying no way to Whaler’s Way

0
  It’s easy to get excited about South Australia’s burgeoning space industry. Supporting a growing space industry, and the vital jobs that come with it,...

Sudarshan Pattnaik creates 125 sand chariots on Rath Yatra eve

0
  On the eve of Rath Yatra of Lord Jagannath, renowned sand artist Sudarshan Pattnaik has created 125 sand chariots and a sand sculpture of...