fbpx
Tuesday, January 26, 2021

Research links early motherhood to kids having ADHD

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Young mothers have a greater chance of having a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), warn researchers from the University of South Australia. ADHD is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder which impacts a person’s ability to exert age-appropriate self-control.

“The findings could help improve reproductive health in women and deliver better outcomes for their children,” said Hong Lee, Associate Professor at the University of South Australia.

- Advertisement -

“Young mums can have it tough, especially as they’re adjusting to becoming a parent while they’re still young themselves,” Lee added.

Published in the journal Nature’s Scientific Reports, the study explored the genetic relationship between female reproductive traits and key psychiatric disorders. They found that the genetic risk of ADHD in children was strongly associated with early maternal age at first birth, particularly for women younger than 20.

Using genetic data of 220,685 women via the UK Biobank, the study examined genetic correlations between five female reproductive traits (age at first birth, age at first sexual intercourse, age at first occurrence of menstruation, age at menopause, and number of live births) and six common psychiatric disorders (ADHD, autism, eating disorders, depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia).

“The approach is twofold. Firstly, we’re able to inform young women about the high genetic risk of having a child with ADHD if they give birth at a young age,” Lee said. According to the researchers, this might caution and prevent them from giving birth at an immature age, which not only improves their reproductive health but also the maternal environment for their babies.

“Secondly, we’re able to educate young mothers about the features of ADHD, such as impulsivity and inattentive behaviours, which may help mothers better recognise the condition in their child and seek treatment sooner than later,” Lee said.

ADHD is a highly heritable disorder which means that a young mother might also have the genes affecting ADHD risk which is then inherited by her child, the study said.

IANS

- Advertisement -

Related Articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Podcasts

Ep8: Indian links in Indigenous Australian poet Ali Cobby Eckermann’s life

0
To celebrate NAIDOC week 2020 (between 8-15 November) I spoke to Yakunytjatjara poet Ali Cobby Eckermann about her time in India where she taught...

Ep 7: In the case of Sushant Singh Rajput

0
  The torrid and high-octane Sushant Singh Rajput case has been fodder for Indian people and press for the last few months. The actor’s tragic...

Ep 6: The Indian LGBTQ+ community in 2020

0
  It’s been two years since the world’s largest democracy repealed the draconian Section 377 which used to allow discrimination against homosexual people. Only this...

Latest News

aboriginal flag

Indigenous Australians, living without conciliation

0
  I am a citizen of Australia and yet I am not a citizen of the nation I reside in within Australia. This anomaly affects...

The night we fled our home in Kashmir

0
  “26 January is coming up, memsaab,” the milkman I had known for years said to me. “Maybe you should put up a black flag...
the white tiger netflix

Review: The White Tiger (Netflix)

0
  "Don't believe for a second there's a million-rupee game show you can win to get out of it". That's Balram Halwai in The White...
lilly singh

WATCH: Lilly Singh as Sima Taparia in “Indian Matchbreaking”

0
  Whether we liked it or not, most of us gave into the Sima Taparia craze during lockdown. Within days, we'd all binged on Netflix's...
karl rock

From New Zealand to New Delhi: Meet YouTube’s Karl Rock

0
  When Karl Rock picks up the phone (with a cheerful ‘Namaste!’ no less), his New Zealand accent is apparent. That is, until he bursts...