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Thursday, February 25, 2021

Sari, starry times!

Reading Time: 3 minutes

UQ students get a taste of Indian attire, writes AKANSHA PANDAY

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Now, who would pass up an opportunity to try on some Bollywood garb?

Especially if there are locals around to drape that sari around you, or tie that turban on your head, and then offer you some Indian food!

That was the idea at the University of Queensland Indian Students Society (UQISS) stall at the recent Market Day event.

It was a way of introducing India to the university community, by means of food and clothing.

It turned out to be a masterstroke.

It was amazing to see the speed with which passers-by said yes to the saris and lehngas, and the kurtas and the pagdi (turban), demonstrating their eagerness to learn about another culture.

It brought forth huge smiles, and many could not resist doing the hand movements and hip shakes of the Bollywood dance (or as they are otherwise known, ‘screwing in the lightbulb with one hand while patting the dog with the other’!)

Just as intended, everyone walked away from the stall with mood instantly uplifted.

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is what Bollywood is all about – putting you in a happy mood!

Market Day is the University of Queensland Union’s way of showing students that uni is more than just studying, as some 190 clubs and societies showcase what they are all about. Students are offered a chance to follow their hobbies – or develop new ones – and meet up with others with similar interests.

It was held this year on 29 July at Campbell Road, Campbell Place and the Great Court at UQ’s St Lucia Campus.

UQISS is a club not just for Indians but for anyone with an interest in India and Indian activities. It has 200 members and a vibrant and energetic student committee who have an interesting calendar of events in the pipeline. It has been proudly representing India at the university for many years now.

Check out their activities at

www.facebook.com/UQISS

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